Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for March, 2016

Apparently, I am the first person to complete SEI CERT’s online version of their course in C/C++ secure coding. With all my pausing the videos to take notes, it took me forty hours to get through, but it was worth the time. Actually, it’s two courses, one in security concepts and the other in secure C/C++ coding.

There’s four full days worth of material presented. The videos are chunked into 2 – 60 minute segments, which is helpful as the presenters are speaking to an actual class. This choice of format is both good and bad. Good in that you see real questions being asked. Bad in that, as with many classroom situations, the presenters go off into the weeds at times.

There are six exercises covering major elements (strings, integers, files, I/O, etc.). For these, web interfaced Debian Linux VMware VMs are provided. These boot quickly and have all tools required to perform the exercises. An hour is allotted for each, which is plenty of time. Following each is a section covering the solutions. This is especially helpful as there’s no one to ask questions of during. It’s also possible to download a copy of the VM being used. Sadly, no provision for Windows or native Macintosh environments.

Two books are provided (in various formats). The Secure Coding in C and C++, Second Edition and The CERT® C Coding Standard, Second Edition: 98 Rules for Developing Safe, Reliable, and Secure Systems (2nd Edition).

Generally, I found the material was well delivered. The content in the areas of (narrow) strings, integers and memory handling were exhaustive. The sections on file handling and concurrency were almost completely lacking any Windows coverage. Given that number of systems used by businesses and individuals based on Windows, this is quite disappointing. There was also a bit of hand waving around the use of wide characters. Not providing complete coverage here is a true deficiency as properly dealing with the reality of mixed string types is a reality that isn’t going to go away.

As to this being a C and C++ class, well, sort of. There are nods to C++, but like so much code out there, the C++ is tacked on the side. It really should be treated as a separate class as is done with Java. Many recommended mitigations can with the proviso that they were not portable. I think that when you’re dealing with security, the fact that there exists a mitigation outweighs its portability. These things can be abstracted to achieve portability. As someone who’s spent a fair amount of time doing cross-platform development (Unix-MacOS, MacOS-Windows, Linux-Windows), these are important issues to me.

To those who argue that securing code will make it slow, I would ask what a single security compromise would cost their company in reputation and direct monetary terms.

Would I recommend the class? Yes. There are important concepts and real-world examples on display here. I challenge anyone to take this class and not be horrified by the way most C code is written.

Could I teach this material? Definitely.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: